Invitation – Everyday Citizens and Global E-Democracy Trends Speeches – in Minneapolis

NEW: Listen to the one hour speech and Q & A in MP3 – 15MB

I’ll be speaking in Minneapolis next week. Here is the official invitation from the University of Minnesota.

If you are in Minnesota, be there.

Steven Clift

The University of Minnesota Information, Technology, and Everyday Life Initiative (www.cs.umn.edu/itel/) invites you to two events featuring Steven Clift, a leading international expert on “e-democracy”. Both events are open to all.

——————–

Everyday Citizens: Community Life in the Information Age
– A new speech by Steven Clift, publicus.net

5:00 – 6:30 p.m., Thursday, April 21, 2005
402 Walter Library
University of Minnesota, East Bank
Map: onestop.umn.edu/Maps/WaLib/index.html
Parking details are at the end of this message

Join Steven Clift as he ties together the first decade of “e-democracy” with a citizen-centric agenda for building community life and democracy in the the 21st century. The Internet allows citizens to become everyday citizens “anywhere, any time” by deeply connecting them to things local not just global.

What ideas, lessons, and models can we import and combine in order to strengthen the quality of life and democracy in our local communities? After a global speaking tours across 25 countries, places as diverse as Mongolia, Iceland, Lebanon, and South Korea, Clift connects the best online realities in an optimistic recipe that will help us defeat Internet-empowered “politics as usual” and counter the emerging virtual civil war among partisans online.

A reception follows Steven’s talk @ 6 p.m. The reception will be Walter Library 402.

—–

Global E-democracy Trends: Leading Governments and E-democracy
– A bonus presentation by Steven Clift –

3:00 – 4:30 p.m., Thursday, April 21, 2005
402 Walter Library
University of Minnesota, East Bank
Parking details are at the end of this message

For those interested in an in-depth exploration of governments and leading e-democracy practices, join Steven Clift as he presents examples from around the world. A sample of presentation slides used across a many countries are available from publicus.net/speaker.html

This session includes an eye-opening opportunity to visit leading websites. Recently presented to top staff in the U.S. House of Representatives as well as e-democracy practitioners from the Australian government, this presentation helps those in the public sector, media, as well as citizens discover opportunities and challenges for improving democracy and governance in the information age.

——————–

About Steven Clift
– Full biography at publicus.net/about.html

Steven Clift, a leading global expert on “e-democracy,” has spoken hundreds of times in 25 countries. In 1994, he led the creation of the world’s first election-oriented web site from Minnesota – E-Democracy.Org. He is the editor of DoWire.Org, the Democracies Online e-mail list, blog, and wiki with participants in over 80 countries. He shares dozens of the articles he’s written for the United Nations, the OECD, the Internet Society, and others from his Publicus.Net website.

Steven, twice listed on PoliticsOnline.com’s “25 Who Are Changing the World of Internet and Politics,” is a frequent media commentator on e-democracy. He focuses on the democratically transformative uses of the Internet between elections.

A past project coordinator for the Markle Foundation’s Web White & Blue project, Clift recently directed four pilot projects for the UK Local E-democracy National Project. Between research contracts and projects, he enjoys life as a professional public speaker on e- democracy. Over the last 18 months he shared his insights, often with governments, and gathered new case studies in Mongolia, South Korea, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Iceland, Denmark, France, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, The Netherlands and Belgium.

Steven Clift volunteers as Board Chair of E-Democracy.Org, which is currently expanding its local citizen-based online “Issues Forums” model for citizen engagement beyond Minnesota. E-Democracy.Org is using the new open source GroupServer.Org technology along with a development guide funded by the UK Office of Deputy Prime Minister to launch forums in the UK and beyond.

Steven Clift and his wife Laurel live in Minneapolis, Minnesota and can be reached in just about every imaginable way from: publicus.net/contact.html

——————–

Information, Technology, and Everyday Life Initiative
(ITEL).

These lectures are sponsored by the University of Minnesota ITEL Initiative (www.cs.umn.edu/itel/). This initiative is sponsoring a series of public lectures at the University and a conference that will bring together visionaries from across the country with scholars at the University of Minnesota to explore a research agenda around information, technology, and everyday life. A primary goal will be to jumpstart an interdisciplinary research agenda that explores these issues at the University of Minnesota Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

Contact: Joseph A. Konstan, Computer Science and Engineering, (612) 625-1831.

——————–

Parking

Parking is available in the Church Street Ramp
onestop.umn.edu/Maps/ChurchGar/index.html,
the Weisman Museum Garage
onestop.umn.edu/Maps/WeisGar/index.html or in
the Washington Avenue Ramp
onestop.umn.edu/Maps/WashRamp/index.html

2 Comments to “Invitation – Everyday Citizens and Global E-Democracy Trends Speeches – in Minneapolis”

  1. MNteractive Says:

    links from Technoratias well as e-democracy practitioners from the Australian government, this presentation helps those in the public sector, media, as well as citizens discover opportunities and challenges for improving democracy and governance in the information age. More info at Clift’s site

  2. Steven Clift’s Notes - Democracies Online » Blog Archive » Will my first child be an e-citizen? An everyday citizen. Audio podcast of Everyday Citizen speech by Steven Clift Says:

    [...] Earlier this year, I gave an important National Press Club “style” speech about Everyday Citizens: Community Life in the Information Age. When I walk down a street or drive through the countryside, I always imagine better ways to connect local people for stronger communities using information and communications technologies. There isn’t one technical solution for this, but if we apply the required democratic motivation, we can make everyday citizenship part of our lives. [...]


more groups wiki blog newswire home home